For many small businesses, the best way to increase profitability is to increase turnover, as there’s no limit to sales but there is a limit to how much you can reduce your costs.

Let’s look at how you can focus on each of the five ways in our profit increase calculator to achieve your goal of improving profits.

Increase Your Leads

By interacting with greater numbers of people, you’ll increase your chances of turning more consumers into customers – or at the very least, having them lead you to potential customers.

For example, if you own a convenience store and you can come up with some attractive signage out front to get more people into your store, you’ll increase your leads.

So what can you do to increase leads or make more people aware of your business? A few tactics you might consider using to increase your leads include:

  • Advertising – set a budget and increase how much your business is promoted.
  • Direct marketing – work out your target audience and market directly to them via email.
  • Network – attend industry events and conferences to meet potential customers. These may be moved online for the meantime.
  • Create a website – to open online and international opportunities.
  • Develop new distribution channels – think about using agents, licensing your goods, or using new distributors.

Convert More of Your Leads into Customers

How many potential customers walk out of your store, leave your website, or inquire about your services without making a purchase?

Just imagine if you could convert 10% of those people into customers. How many extra sales per day would that be?

A few tactics you might consider using to convert more leads into customers include:

  • Arrange training for employees – on sales conversion and sales closing methods.
  • Personally attending a sales training course.
  • Running demonstrations – for potential customers to see what you have to offer and how they could benefit.
  • Highlighting the benefits of your goods or services – through promotional material, your website, blog advice, social media platforms, and free trial offers.
  • Preparing incentives – for your staff to offer to potential customers, hopefully encouraging them to purchase.

Increase the Number of Items You Sell per Customer

If you can entice your customers to buy just one more item from your business each year, your sales (and hopefully your profits) will increase.

A few tactics you might think about using to increase the number of items you sell to each customer include:

  • Widening your product range – by asking customers what else they would be interested in buying from you.
  • Bundling products and services together – like adding after-sales help to certain products.
  • Increasing capacity and capability – for example, purchasing extra equipment to increase your capacity while hiring additional staff to enhance your capability.
  • Researching your competitors’ offerings – to find product or service opportunities.

Increase Your Average Sale Value

Can you come up with some ways of increasing the average value of each sale you make? Rather than hiking up prices, see if you can increase prices by small margins (like 1-3%) or find ways to sell higher-priced items more often.

A few tactics you might think about using to increase your average sale include:

  • Training your staff – so they’re confident offering complementary items and upselling more expensive goods.
  • Increasing prices across the board – would your customers notice a small price increase? Consider informing them and trying it, as the extra money will go towards your bottom line.
  • Advertising your higher-valued products or services more often.
  • Developing a premium product or service – and encouraging your regulars to go for it.

Increase Net Profit Percentage

A few tactics you might try to increase your net profit percentage include:

  • Identifying and monitoring your top five expenses in your budget reports.
  • Finding out where you can make savings and reduce costs.
  • Concentrating on higher-margin services or products.
  • Looking into alternative suppliers with cheaper supplies.

Review these five ways of increasing your profits at least every year. In the meantime, plug some figures into our profit increase calculator to test what you could change and the effects of those changes on your profit.

By using simple, practical steps, you can improve your business’s profitability. Chat to us to find out more. Click here to book a free chat with an MBP Business Partner.

We’ve heard this before: the COVID-19 pandemic is an unprecedented global health and financial crisis that has caught many off guard. While the threats to human life are very real, the damage to the health of businesses is really just starting to show. In the coming weeks and months, many businesses will be in a fight for financial survival.

The seriousness of the disease and the lack of a vaccine (at the time of writing this) have prompted governments around the world to impose strict measures to contain the virus. These restrictions in people’s movements and the temporary lockdown of non-essential services have definitely taken a toll on businesses and families across the country.

While there has been a lot of talk on how to avoid contracting the virus and how businesses can operate safely to adapt to the current conditions, this article will focus on helping you manage the financial survival aspects of your business during COVID-19. Read on for our tips on cushioning the impact on your business.

Update Your Financial Records.

The first step in planning your financial survival in such a difficult environment is getting a crystal clear and up to date understanding of the financial position of your business. This means updating your financial records and keeping them in order as frequently as possible. Knowing things such as your cash position and assets that can be sold quickly will go a long way in helping you make informed business decisions. Good records build a solid foundation for a successful business. They’re also really important when applying for loans or government grants, subsidies and assistance.

Examine the Financial Health of Your Business.

Following on from the first item, it is important to get a good grasp of your business’ current financial health through a careful analysis of your books and statements. By looking at key financial figures, you will get an idea of how your business is doing. You can see fundamental factors such as the liquidity and solvency of your business which will help you decide on the best steps forward as you deal with the crisis and the aftermath. Chat to us for help with these financial pieces.

Improve your Cashflow.

A lot of businesses across the country are facing cash flow problems at the moment. If you are one of them, you’re certainly not alone. However, the key here is not letting the problem worsen or become unmanageable.

Preparing a cashflow forecast should give you some forewarning before issues even arise and will allow you to address them early on. By quantifying your forward bookings, forward orders, and work in progress, you will get to identify future cash flow and plan accordingly.

You can also take the following measures to boost your cash flow:

  • Identifying the demand for your products or services, so you’ll know where to focus on and where you can reduce stock orders
  • Cutting back on unnecessary expenses
  • Urging your debtors to pay you, negotiating on a payment scheme that will work for both of you
  • Seeking payment extensions or debt re-structuring
  • Invoicing as soon as you deliver the product or service
  • Seeking external investors or lenders
  • Taking advantage of financial support from your government

Increase Online Sales Where Possible.

With the government implementing stricter restrictions to prevent the further spread of the virus, you should find ways to move your products and services online – if you can – and continue to serve existing and new clients. The situation that we are in is forcing business owners to re-imagine their business and re-evaluate their business models. You’ve got to adapt and be resilient. It’s those businesses that will survive.

Survive 2020 by Managing Your Financials

It’s safe to say not many of us factored a global pandemic into our 2020 business plans. Although there is no foolproof strategy to get through what’s proving to be a turbulent 2020, the tips for financial survival shared here should be able to give you some guidance on minimising the risks to your small business.

Want some more help? Our team of advisors love to help businesses. We’ll help you develop a plan to weather the headwinds of the coming months, while saving you time and money along the way. Contact us today and we’ll work through it together.

If you’ve been to one of our business development events before, you’ll likely be familiar with the bucket analogy we often use. Put very simply, your business is like a bucket with holes in it: when you earn money, the bucket fills up. Running costs such as direct costs (COGS) and business expenses create holes, causing the bucket to empty. You need to keep the bucket filling fast enough so it doesn’t completely empty out, or you need to reduce the number of holes in the bucket. Some business expenses (holes) are mandatory, you can’t run your business without them. Others are controllable – and you can reduce the amount of money leaking out by managing these costs better.

It’s important to understand the different types of overheads, in order to know which ones you can control, and therefore manage better to keep your bucket fuller. Most people you speak to will tell you there are two types of overheads: Fixed and Variable. But I propose that a third type exists, the Optional ones – and my advice below is based on these 3 categories…

First, let’s clarify what a business expense is: Business expenses (also known as overheads) are indirect costs that don’t directly relate to the product or service you provide, but they do support your activity. For example, direct labor and materials wouldn’t be considered overheads but things like office rental and stationery would be.

Now let’s look at the different types:

Fixed Business Expenses

As the name implies, fixed overheads don’t change. They’re the non-negotiables you must incur in order to stay in business and they aren’t overly affected by changes in activity. Common examples include rent, insurance, phone, petrol, etc. Most fixed overheads don’t fluctuate all that much from year-to-year either, so the best indicator of what you can expect for the year ahead is to look at what you paid the previous year.

Working out your total fixed overheads for the year is a pretty quick calculation, but the trick to keep your head above the water and ensure you earn enough to cover your fixed overheads is to divide up the total amount by 11 months instead of 12. Why? Working on an 11 month year allows for the seasonal effects of Christmas/NY and Easter when you’re typically a lot quieter and work is hard to come by. After you’ve done that calculation, you then know how much Gross Profit you need to earn each month to cover your fixed overheads.

Variable Business Expenses

Variable overheads are the ones that do change month-to-month, reflecting changes in output. A few examples include advertising, sales activity, gear for the staff, etc. While they are variable, and you can’t strictly control them that much, you’ll generally know enough to be able to budget fairly accurately if you look at your previous year – and this will help inform your decisions re optional overhead spend.

To work out variable overheads, again do the 11-month calculation and then add this amount to the Gross Profit figure you need to earn each month.

Optional Business Expenses

This is where things get interesting and the bit I really want to talk about because these are the overheads you have the most control over. They’re the overheads you don’t need to spend to keep your business running, but they’re things you want to do.

Without question, you can always spend more money in your business – new carpet for the office, a better website, replacement tools for the staff, another office support person, health and safety improvements, business mentoring and coaching… There is literally no end to how much money you could spend.

But there aren’t endless jobs, nor endless amounts of time to do those jobs, which means there isn’t endless money to pay for these overheads either. So what do you do?

You have to budget. Make a wish list. Prioritise the things you really want to do and work these into your budget. The combined total of your fixed, variable and optional overheads must be covered by Gross Profit. So you have to realistically work out how much Gross Profit you can earn each month, then deduct the amount you need to spend on Fixed and Variable Overheads. Whatever’s left – if anything – is what you have available to spend on your Optional overheads. Or you could keep it and help increase your Net Profit… the decision is yours.

And finally, whatever you do, don’t spend more on business expenses than what you’re earning in Gross Profit. Do that and you’ll be back looking for a new job within months.

Need Some Extra Guidance?

If you need some extra guidance or training on exactly what to look for, the team at MBP have a range of solutions to help. Our Financial Awareness Coaching can help you to develop the skill to manage your business finances like a pro. Also, keep an eye out on our Facebook page as we share updates on the timings for our Know Your Numbers and other key business education webinars.

At a time like this, money is tight for pretty much every business. Cutting costs can be a quick and easy way to improve the profitability of your business. Introducing well thought out cost saving tactics can bring immediate savings and ensure you remain profitable in the short term.

But it’s important that cost-control measures are carefully managed. Eliminating errant expenses is clearly beneficial, but indiscriminate cost-cutting could lead to a drop in quality, or poor morale if staff fear being made redundant or are not given the tools they need to do their job efficiently.

This risk is heavily reduced by identifying where you can safely trim costs, setting clear cost-reduction targets, and researching any cost saving tactics before making changes to your business.

Planning Effective Cost Saving Tactics

The first step towards reducing costs is identifying your major cost areas. These are likely to include:

  • Production
  • Purchasing
  • Sales and marketing
  • Financing
  • Administration
  • Facilities maintenance.

Start by assessing your profit and loss statement for the last six months and rank all your expenses from highest to lowest, working your way down the list and identifying areas where you can reduce costs. It’s a good idea to first focus on identifying cost-saving measures in areas where you’ll see the biggest return. For example, it’s smart to work toward saving 5% on a $200,000 expense rather than a slightly higher percentage on a lower-cost expense.

Trial New Ideas

You might find it’s difficult to anticipate savings without actually implementing new systems and processes. Remember that any changes you make don’t need to be permanent. If you aren’t sure if a cost-saving measure is suitable for your business, consider trying it for a few months then assessing the results. This way, you’ll soon get an idea of the real cost savings without having to commit long-term to new processes or changes.

Any new processes or systems should be benchmarked and frequently revisited to ensure they are still suitable for your business. Consider asking staff for feedback around any changes to make sure there are no hidden problems that could be costing you more than the cost-saving value.

If you are in doubt about any potential changes, ask an advisor. We are more than happy to chat through this with you.

Quick Savings

You might be surprised to find that significant savings can be made without having to worry about your quality and affecting performance. Here are the most popular ways to trim costs without making radical changes.

  • Eliminate unnecessary costs – start with waste reduction, heating costs, and utility charges.
  • Reduce inefficiency by identifying manual tasks that could be sped up with technology or completed less frequently.
  • Avoid frequent, small orders that cost more than larger orders and take additional time to complete.
  • Reduce travel expenses by booking air travel earlier and using cheaper accommodation on business trips.
  • Find alternatives to high-priced suppliers or negotiate better payment terms or discounts on purchased goods.
  • Revise your credit policies to encourage prompt payment.
  • Brainstorm quick cost savings with your staff – they might have some useful suggestions you may have overlooked.

Significant Savings

Once you have identified your major cost areas, you may want to investigate potential ways to save money by changing existing processes.

Some of the most common opportunities are listed below, but before adopting any changes you should be aware of any potential damage to your core business activities.

  • Cut payroll costs by outsourcing non-essential activities.
  • Redesign your existing processes to eliminate duplication, and cut time wastage.
  • Make use of current technology, or latest industry thinking.
  • Agree to long-term supply contracts, or guarantee a minimum purchase amount to secure better terms.
  • Trim back or revise your current product offering and remove poor-performing products.
  • Form strategic alliances with other businesses to buy larger volumes.
  • Consider subletting office space, or relocating to a more cost-efficient location.

There may also be other costs such as long-term, fixed-rate business loans or fixed-price contracts for raw materials that you may be able to reduce when these are up for renewal or tender.

Pitfalls to Avoid

Reducing costs can have a negative effect, so you’ll need to be sure that changes will not compromise your operational performance.

Some common pitfalls include:

  • Over-dependence on one supplier could put you at risk if your supplier fails.
  • Reducing your marketing budget could affect your marketing strategy.
  • Tighter control of business finances could leave you without a safety margin if cash flow becomes tight.
  • Cutting short-term costs such as training, research, and development, or advertising can lead to long-term weaknesses.

Employee Costs

Reducing employee-related costs is generally risky and counterproductive in the long-term. Reducing costs such as staff training or meeting times could lead to poor staff morale and reduced productivity.

Changing an employee’s terms and conditions can also create legal issues in some circumstances, so it’s always a good idea to get expert advice before making a decision. Making employees redundant could bring short-term costs and the risk of possible employment proceedings. It may also contribute to low morale.

These problems can be reduced by maintaining clear communication with employees. Introducing cost saving through improved practices and procedures will require a degree of employee ‘buy-in’ so it’s important your employees are aware of why you are making changes. Employees may need additional training and support over these periods.

Next Steps

  • Schedule a staff meeting to review your costs and brainstorm possible saving measures.
  • Commit to an ongoing cost-control and monitoring process (or delegate to key staff to manage the process).
  • Ask our advisors to assist you with cost-saving initiatives or brainstorm ideas.

Please get in touch with us to find out how we can help you to identify and implement some cost saving tactics. Click Here to book a free chat with an MBP Business Partner.

For many years, the low value asset threshold for depreciation had been set at $500.00. This meant that everything over $500.00 had to be capitalised and depreciated as a fixed asset. The cost of many business items has increased significantly since the rules were last reviewed. At the same time, the useful life of the items has decreased. This is why the government was reviewing the rules and planning to increase the threshold.

The pandemic came along and the under review low value asset rules were a perfect option to allow some quick action to help stimulate business investment. The updated rules were one of the first COVID-19 Business Response measures, announced in March 2020.

The New Low Value Asset Rules

From the 17th March 2020, the low value asset threshold for depreciation has been increased to $5,000.00.

This is a ten-fold increase from the previous threshold of $500.00. The governments intention for this is to spur business investment. It is hoped that businesses will be encouraged to spend more in order to take advantage of the ability to expense items costing up to $5,000.00. This was a direct reaction to the drop in business confidence as a result of COVID-19.

12 Month Time-frame for New Rules

This new threshold is strictly limited and expires on the 16th March 2021. In order to expense a low value asset costing up to $5,000.00, you must purchase it on or after the 17th March 2020 but before the end of business on the 16th March 2021.

There was initially some confusion around when the rules would come into effect. This was largely due to the chaotic situation in the early days of the pandemic and the requirement for the rules to be amended by legislation. The 12-month period is as outlined above and is not in line with the standard 2020-2021 tax year.

Low Value Asset Rules from March 2021

From the 17th March 2021, the low value asset threshold for depreciation will be $1,000.00.

This is double the old limit of $500.00 and is in line with the original uplift intentions signaled before COVID-19.

There is no time limit on this adjustment. It will remain effective until varied by future legislation.

Benefits of the Adjusted Low Value Asset Rules

Benefits for Small Business Owners

If you have been put off investing in your business because you would have to wait years to claim the full tax benefits, this may be the opportunity you have been waiting for. Need a few new computers? Now’s the time to invest. Need to refresh the workspace to make it a bit more inviting and productive? Now’s the time to invest. Need to optimise your online presence for post-covid growth? Now’s the time to invest.

If you run a small business selling to other businesses, this is a perfect opportunity to market the tax deduct-ability of your products. For many savvy business owners, it might be just the sweetner they need to convince them to spend up to $5,000.00 with you.

Benefits for Residential Property Investors and Landlords

The Healthy Homes Standards are a potentially costly burden for may landlords and property investors to bear. These changes offer the ability to implement the required expenses and claim the full tax deduction in this tax year.

This means that you can invest in the new heatpump, glazing or insulation and claim the full amount as an expense (as long as it remains under $5,000.00).

The requirement for you to include a statement of compliance with the Healthy Homes Standards has also been extended by the government. You were required to comply with this new regulation from the 1st of July 2020. This has now been delayed until the 1st of December 2020.

There will not be a better time to get the required upgrades done.

Depreciation Adjustments Announced with Same Legislation

The government also announced changes to the commercial investment property depreciation rules in the same package of tax changes. This will allow depreciation in much the same was as prior to the 0% rules which were passed in October of 2010. If you would like to view the IRD information on this announcement, click here. This depreciation rule may apply to your AirBNB properties.

 

If you would like a run-through of the new rules and how they may benefit your business, feel free to get in touch with us. You can book in a free chat with one of our team or simply flick us an email.