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Selling a business is a bit like selling your home. You want to get the best price possible, with the least amount of effort and at the lowest cost to you. What you do need to be clear on are the reasons you want to sell, plus be 100% certain that a sale is the best option for you.

As accountants and business advisors, we regularly play a role in helping clients sell a business. We believe it is important to consult with professionals such as ourselves because selling a business is a specialist area. To demonstrate this, we are sharing some of the processes and knowledge required to achieve a successful, legal and profitable business sale.

What Are Your Reasons for Selling a Business?

There is most likely a lot of your blood, sweat and tears which have gone into your business. There is probably also a large amount of pride and emotional connections associated with it too. So, chances are that you have thought long and hard about whether or not selling your business is the right move for you.

The decision you have come to would have been based on one or more reasons, such as:

  • you are ready to retire
  • you don’t enjoy owning a business any more
  • there are health problems which are affecting your ability to manage your business
  • it is time for a change and you want to do something else
  • you want to release your equity locked within the business
  • there’s a financial downturn and you want to get out now
  • a partnership dispute is causing problems

It is always best though, to ensure that the one or more reasons for selling absolutely require the business to be sold by having a chat with us. For instance, a financial downturn can be beneficial for a business which can pivot and reach a new market. Or employees can be hired to assist when health problems force the owner to step back. If you are 100% clear about your decision, it’s time to move onto the next stage: collating all your paperwork!

Organising Your Paperwork When Selling a Business

It would be a fair assumption that one of the first things an owner considers when deciding to sell their business is what the purchase price should be. However, like with selling of anything, the purchase price cannot simply be plucked out of thin air. Instead it relies on having a solid understanding of and updated knowledge about the business first. This requires you to get all your paperwork in order, including:

  • up to date financial records for current and previous tax years, including profit and lost statements, personal drawings, balance sheets, and employee costs
  • list of assets
  • current business plan
  • supplier contracts are current
  • details about all leases
  • any debts the business has are paid in full or have a plan to be paid prior to the sale
  • any legal issues are resolved
  • all regulations and requirements are complete, including health and safety planning
  • full documentation of all business processes

Finally, you will need to prepare an information memorandum for potential buyers which include all the above items. It should also contain specific details about business growth opportunities and other pertinent information not included elsewhere.

If all of this sounds too challenging or you don’t have time or want to do it, we can help. Get in touch with us today and we can start planning the sale of your business. Next though, we’ll cover how to get a valuation for your business.

How Much is Your Business Worth?

Even if you chose to take the DIY option when selling your business, it is highly recommended that you have it valued professionally. After all, a business valuation completed incorrectly can cost you plenty of money!

When it comes to valuing a New Zealand business, there are three main methods:

  • asset valuation – when you calculate the total sum of assets on your balance sheet
  • market approach – the amount of earning potential your business has which is based upon the theoretical market demand
  • income valuation – projecting the future cashflows of your business

You’ll often find that there is a valuation calculation used too, known as EBITDA. EBITDA stands for Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation and Amortisation. Generally, it is used to identify a business’ operating profit, but can be unreliable when a business is close to break-even.

Now we need to have a chat about price and value. We can help you identify the value of your business, which is taking into consideration the EBITDA, to know how much to ask for your business. However, the price of your business is the amount someone is willing to pay to buy it. Like with calculating its value, there are factors which can affect the price of your business, including:

  • physical presentation of your business
  • current economic climate
  • lifestyle the business provides
  • a comprehensive operating manual ready for an easy takeover
  • condition of fixed assets
  • existing restraints of trade
  • business name and trademarking
  • additional clauses in the sale and purchase agreements

Once you have finished the valuation of your business, it’s time to start looking for a buyer and we’re going to share some tips on doing this with you next.

Where to Find a Buyer When Selling a Business

When selling a property, most people use a real estate agent to help them find a buyer. When selling a business though, you’ve got a few other options up your sleeve. These include:

  • hiring a business broker – a business broker helps connect buyers and sellers, and they usually have an area of expertise. A broker is likely to have a database of buyers, as well as have a solid understanding of how to attract other potential buyers to consider purchasing your business. A broker can help you with the valuing and marketing of your business and expects a commission upon completion of the sale.
  • talking with employees – you may have a current employee who is interested in purchasing the business from you. Already knowing how the business is run is a huge bonus for them, and with some help from you, they may be willing to take the next step.
  • approaching your competitors – instead of having to compete with you, your competitors could buy your business out instead!
  • customers – do you have some raving fans of your business? They may be ready to purchase and run the business themselves.
  • advertising – put ads on social media, radio and even print media asking for interested parties to get in touch.

With interest from buyers comes negotiations and contracts. This is another area where professional expertise is recommended. From business advisors to lawyers, it is best to have everything completed by those who know what they are doing. Yes, they will charge you for their services, but the financial price you can end up paying for mistakes at this time can be far greater.

We’d like to offer you our experience and knowledge as professional accountants and business advisors when selling your business. We can walk you through the process, ensuring you receive the best possible price with the lowest possible amount of stress and costs. Get in touch with the team here at MBP Advisors and Accountants today and let’s meet up for a chat.

If you’re considering a business rebranding, you’re likely to have multiple reasons as to why you are likely to take this path. Whatever your reasons, business rebranding isn’t something that just happens overnight and requires identifying the specific reasons why a rebrand is necessary. Some of the main reasons business owners move to rebrand include:

  • repositioning their business to target a new audience or be more appealing to an existing audience
  • branching out to a wider international-based audience
  • updating an old outdated image
  • moving away from a bad reputation
  • a merger with a new company or having new directors join the business
  • making your business stand out from other similar ones

Once you have decided to rebrand, you’ll need to decide upon a rebranding strategy. From here, you’ll need to follow the steps necessary to make the transition from old to the new brand. We’ll cover both points in this article.

Choosing Your Business Rebranding Strategy

You’ve decided to move forward and begin rebranding. To begin this journey, you first need to decide on your rebranding strategy.

  • partial rebrand – more like a subtle image change, a partial rebrand is mostly a visual change to meet the needs of your business and target audience.
  • full brand – a complete reworking of your brand, from the values and mission statement, the products or services you offer and the way the brand looks.

You can involve your target market in this decision. Ask them what they like and don’t like about the brand as it is today. Having an understanding of what they think is incredibly useful!

Of course, the option you end up choosing will depend upon the main reasons you want to rebrand. Once you’ve made your choice, next comes the rebranding steps themselves.

Steps When Undertaking a Business Rebranding

There are five key steps we’re going to individually walk you through when it comes to rebranding your business. They are similar to what you would do when establishing a new brand, which in essence is what a rebrand involves:

Identifying your brand’s target market and audience.

You’ll need to re-establish exactly who your target audience is and where they hang out. Undertaking surveys, observations, competitor analysis and simply identifying who is buying from you will give you the information needed to do this. Nail out your new buyer persona, which includes details such as their age, income, location, likes and dislikes. This information will help you when creating content for your website and social media platforms.

Defining what your business’ mission, values and vision are.

Here you’ll redefine exactly what your business stands for. Why do you do what you do? How will you do it? What are the reasons behind the way you do things? Included in this section is your brand voice. This includes the words you’ll use, along with your tone of voice.

Choosing a new name for your business.

One of the hardest things people find to do is naming a business. You likely spent a considerable amount of time choosing your original name and now need a new one. When brainstorming a new business name, think about making up a new word, changing the spelling of an existing word, using an acronym, combining words or stating what you do. Make sure to check your business name using OneCheck for existing trademarks, domains and social media accounts too.

Coming up with a new slogan for your brand.

A slogan is a catchy little phrase associated with your business. If your old slogan still fits, then keep it. If not, brainstorm ideas for a new one. Think about making a claim, providing instructions, being metaphorical and including compliments within your slogan.

Building your brand’s identity from bottom up.

Here we are talking about your brand’s visual identity. Your logo, colour palette, fonts and imagery are all things to consider. Using the services of a graphic designer here will pay dividends, as they will be able to use all of the information you gathered in steps 1-4 and transform it into a brand guide for your business.

It is often this step which business owners find the easiest out of the entire rebranding process. You have learnt about what worked and what didn’t with your old logo and colours, and usually have a clearer idea of what you do want. In short, look for a logo which is clear and easily recognisable as yours. The colour palette needs to be chosen based upon what your audience would best respond to and is appropriate for you to use in a variety of manners. The fonts need to work with your brand’s voice and vision, and finally, the shapes and imagery need to help tie everything together.

Where to Next in Your Rebranding?

For many total rebrands, everything a business presents to the world needs to be updated. Website, email, social media and contact details all need to be changed and promoted. This can cause a huge issue if your existing audience didn’t know about your rebrand. That is why it is a great idea to keep them in the loop, helping them feel like a part of the change itself, so it isn’t a huge shock when it happens. It will also keep them informed about the changes your business is making, how these changes will benefit them and how to contact you moving forward.

Don’t forget to also include your employees and contractors in the process too. They can act as brand ambassadors, letting people know about the changes on your behalf. They’re also going to feel included and continue to show brand loyalty as they feel involved in the process.

Then it is all systems go when it comes to promoting your new business. A new website domain name will mean that your organic traffic will be almost non-existent at the start. You will need to put considerable effort into the content of your website and can expect to see searches from Google appearing in around three to six months. You can redirect your old domain name to your new one though so that people entering that one will automatically be taken to the new site.

Promoting your rebrand via social media is key, as you will most likely be able to continue to use the same platform accounts. Sending emails to your existing email lists is also a good idea, and paid advertising can help too. If you have kept your followers engaged and updated during the rebranding process, it shouldn’t be too hard to shift their attention to your new brand.

Finally, make sure that you’ve told your suppliers and businesses whose services you use that you have made the change. A phone call gives the personal touch and is appreciated, especially when followed up by an email which includes all of the new details.

If you are on the fence about undertaking a rebrand, a chat with one of our business advisors can help make things clearer and identify a path moving forwards for you and your business. Get in touch with our team today and together we’ll make things happen.

As many business owners are experiencing, the COVID-19 pandemic has created serious financial difficulties for entrepreneurs. Small businesses especially are faced with cutting their budgets so they can continue to operate—even at a smaller scale—and not have to close for good. They also have to figure out how they can continue marketing themselves so once the pandemic is over, their customers and clients come back to them.

During a financial crisis, a company’s marketing budget is often one of the first areas to face cuts, but halting marketing entirely is a dangerous move.

Instead, try these tips for marketing on a tight budget.

Create video content from home

Video is increasingly becoming a popular marketing tool and it doesn’t have to be expensive. All you need is a smart phone or computer with a camera and some time to film yourself. Create a video series that can be posted on your website or social media feed. Encourage staff to create videos as well, although don’t force them to if they aren’t comfortable with it.

Depending on your business, you can post helpful tips for clients or show some behind the scenes of how your company operates during COVID-19. Hairdressers can show clients how to cut their hair at home (or how not to cut it). Personal trainers can show videos that break down different exercises. Dog groomers can show how to clip pets’ nails or wash the ears.

Host an Online Course

With people staying home and trying to stay entertained, many are looking for ways to keep their minds active. Hosting an online class is a great way to keep your business at the front of their mind, market yourself, and even continue earning money. Develop a course or class that solves your customers’ problems during COVID-19 and advertise it on your website and on social media. It’s up to you if you charge people to attend the course or if you offer it for free.

Think of the obstacles your clients face while they can’t access you and create a course to help them address that issue. Many people right now are looking for ways to keep their meals interesting with limited opportunities to shop. Restaurants or chefs could offer a class (or classes) in creating fun meals with pantry staples or mixing fancy cocktails, for example.

Keep your Social Media Going

Your social media marketing is often free or inexpensive and it keeps people aware of your business. Make sure you continue marketing with your social media posting, even it it’s just to post links to COVID-related resources or informative articles that your audience will appreciate.

Play around with your social media plan to see if there are ways to reach a wider audience without spending a lot of money. Facebook often has credits that make its sponsored posts free or almost free. Those posts reach a wider audience than your regular posts and can bring people to your website.

Divert Cash if you Can

You may have budgeted this year to spend marketing money at trade shows or networking events that will not happen. Instead, put that money in your digital marketing budget. Rather than having your marketing money spread out, focus on one or two areas that get you higher return on investment. These include areas such as search engine optimization and social media.

Final thoughts

It’s tempting to not continue marketing to save money right now, but you run the risk of not having customers when the pandemic is over. Instead, maximize your budget by diverting money into one or two focused areas. Finding ways to engage your customers through videos, online classes and social media will also ensure you’re ready to go when the social distancing is over.

Please get in touch with us if you have any questions. Alternatively, reach out to a marketing expert like The Marketing Baker.

Before you go down the path of seeking capital from outside your business or borrowing funds, identify any other ways of raising capital. If you need funds then sometimes it’s not a loan that you need.

Identify areas in the business to make savings

There’s a good chance that you can generate at least some of the capital you need by using business savings. If you can generate the cash internally, it’s often a better option that increasing your debt or taking investors on board. Look at how much you’ve got available in cash reserves or what contracts or payments are due.

Then look at ways you can make savings and increase your cash flow, such as selling equipment you don’t use very often (and leasing it when you do need it), cutting down on travel expenses, moving some staff from full-time to part-time roles, re-negotiating deals with suppliers for better credit terms and reducing your own salary.

It’s also important to chase up any late payers. Make sure you have robust systems in place for handling debt and collecting what you’re owed.

You’ll be surprised at how much all these savings can add up, generating more cash in the business that can be used to reinvest in business growth.

Shorten Cash Cycles

Shortening your cash cycle will increase your cash reserves, keeping your business going and providing a buffer in times of financial uncertainty. The longer your business goes without cash, the longer it takes you to pay your creditors, and the riskier your business becomes. Encourage your customers to pay using online and mobile payment options – the cash is then in your account immediately. If you have to invoice, do it immediately and incentivise your customers to pay early, such as offering discounts. You can also shorten your credit terms.

Focus Your Attention on Sales

Increasing sales is one of the best ways to improve profitability and bring more cash into the business. There are a number of different ways you can improve your sales numbers, such as making sure you and your staff are all trained in how to cross-sell and up-sell, investigating new distribution channels like an online store, implementing a professional sales system so that you can track customer buying behaviour and predict their needs, or even look into franchising your business if demand warrants it.

It’s important to remember the 80/20 rule: 80% of your sales will come from 20% of your customers, so look into ways you can sell more to your existing customers while still trying to gain new customers through your marketing strategies.

It’s always worth considering a price increase too. There are ways to increase your prices without losing sales, and it’s something that should be done now and again, even if it’s just to keep up with inflation.

Alternatives to Capital

Before you jump into researching the different sources of capital that are available, first consider the alternatives. It could be that, depending on what your growth goals are, you don’t actually need extra capital, you just need to be thinking a bit more creatively.

Raising Capital to Grow Sales

If your main goal is to increase sales, you don’t always need extra cash to be able to do this. There are other options that can help your sales numbers and it’s worth looking into them before you go borrowing money.

Strategic alliances are often worth checking out. Business owners are increasingly discovering the advantages of joint ventures and strategic alliances and many experts see strategic alliances as one of the best paths to rapid growth. There are many ways in which you can work with other businesses or people, ranging from short-term joint ventures to more formal long-term commitments. You can form strategic alliances with suppliers, with customers or with complementary businesses or with non-profit organisations such as charities. Think of how often you see a Subway attached to a service station.

It might also be worth looking at updating your business model. A change in your business model might help you find new opportunities for growth to increase your business’s revenue. Direct selling is the shortest route between your business and its customers. It involves buying directly from you without any go-between. It’s probably the simplest and certainly the most direct business model.

Like many businesses, you might currently sell some items through the web but is it time to make a bigger investment in the online world? Global e-commerce is rising daily and the opportunities for growth are significant.

Whether you want your goods distributed widely through wholesalers or via carefully selected retailers, the tweaks you can make to your distribution channels are almost limitless. If you’re a retailer, you might consider also selling at the wholesale level, and vice versa.

Raising Capital to Expand

Your goals may be more focused on expanding your business and you’re considering how to increase your capital to do this. Before you borrow the funds you need, consider other ways of achieving expansion.

For example, look into leasing equipment instead of buying it. If you want to boost your capacity so you can handle more orders, that doesn’t necessarily mean you have to fork out for the additional equipment you’ll need – you can lease it. The monthly lease payments are often less than what loan repayments would be. You can also lease equipment only when you need it, rather than having it sitting around gathering dust and being unproductive when you don’t.

It’s also worth looking into contracting out some work, especially for large projects. Contractors will often have all the resources they need to handle work, and when you bring them on board you’re getting access to those resources.

You could also consider forming partnerships to jointly produce your goods. For example, if you manufacture coffee tables, you might align your business with one of your suppliers, making it cheaper to get the raw materials you need.

Talk Through Your Options for Raising Capital

There is a lot to consider when looking at raising capital. To talk through all your options, get in touch with an MBP Business Partner. You can book in a free 30 minute chat with us HERE.

As we hit week four of the nationwide lock-down, it’s time to start actively thinking about how you will operate your business out of lock-down. We’ve already discussed developing your business continuity plan, so hopefully you’ve already started planning and putting some actions in place to come out of lock-down ready to thrive.

UPDATE (20th April 2020): New Zealand will move out of COVID-19 Alert Level 4 Lock-down and into Alert Level 3 at Midnight on the morning of Tuesday 28th April 2020. Businesses who need to will be able to use the week in the lead up to this to access their premises and prepare them to open. Strict social distancing and contact-less deliveries must be adhered to. It would be prudent to only allow minimal staff on to your premises to enable you to prepare for opening.

Shifting to Alert Level 3

Once cabinet deems that the Level 4 Lock-down has been successful, they will make an informed decision to lower the alert level. At this stage, the decision will be made on the 20th April. A lifting of the most severe restrictions is then expected for later in April.

Many of the specific details as to what level 3 will look like are still being worked on by the government. However, this level 3 will not be the same as the level 3 we spent 48 hours in before the level 4 lock-down began. We can expect more information on this over the coming days so keep an eye on the covid-19.govt.nz and MBIE websites for more information.

The Core Principles of Level 3

The following are the core government guidelines for level 3:

  • People instructed to stay home in their bubble other than for essential personal movement – including to go to work, school if they have to or for local recreation.
  • Physical distancing of two metres outside home (including on public transport), or one metre in controlled environments like schools and workplaces.
  • Bubbles must stay within their immediate household bubble, but can expand this to reconnect with close family/whānau, or bring in caregivers, or support isolated people. This extended bubble should remain exclusive.
  • Schools (years 1 to 10) and Early Childhood Education centres can safely open, but will have limited capacity. Children should learn at home if possible.
  • People must work from home unless that is not possible.
  • Businesses can open premises, but cannot physically interact with customers.
  • Low risk local recreation activities are allowed.
  • Public venues are closed, e.g. libraries, museums, cinemas, food courts, gyms, pools, playgrounds, markets.
  • Gatherings of up to 10 people are allowed but only for wedding services, funerals and tangihanga. Physical distancing and public health measures must be maintained.
  • Healthcare services use virtual, non-contact consultations where possible.
  • Inter-regional travel is highly limited, e.g. for essential workers, with limited exemptions for others.
  • People at high risk of severe illness (older people and those with existing medical conditions) are encouraged to stay at home where possible, and take additional precautions when leaving home. They may choose to work.

Key Considerations Before Bringing Your Business Out of Lock-down

The EMA has published some key questions to ask yourself before you bring your business out of lockdown:

  • Are there any risks arising from restarting your business or a business activity that has been shut down during alert level 4?
  • How will you ensure all your workers know how to keep themselves safe from exposure to COVID-19?
  • How will you gather information on the wellness of your staff to ensure that they are safe to work?
  • How will you operate your business in a way that keeps workers and others safe from exposure to COVID-19?
  • How will you manage an exposure or suspected exposure to COVID-19?
  • How will you evaluate whether your work processes or risk controls are effective?
  • How do these changes impact on the risks of the work that you do?

These questions are a great starting point for working through your plans to bring your business out of lock-down.

What Will Level 3 Look Like for Your Business out of Lock-down?

Now is the time to start planning what your business will look like at level 3. You’ll need to plan for a range of scenarios and be as prepared as you can be for whatever eventuality arises. As with this entire unprecedented situation, there are more unknowns than knowns and the government will change the operating rules as required to ensure public safety and make sure the the health gains we have made over the weeks of lock-down have not been an expensive waste.

Following government guidelines is essential. If you are able to operate safely within the limitations of level 3 outlined above, make sure you have updated your internal policies to reflect the necessary changes. At a minimum, you will need to look at your HR and Health, Safety and Wellness policies and make sure that your staff are fully aware of the new operating requirements.

Social distancing is still essential, even in the workplace. Large gatherings of more than 10 people are also likely to remain banned. These restrictions will likely be key factors when making your plans to reopen. You may need to operate with staggered start times, reduced staff numbers, a one in one out policy or similar measures. Limiting staff movement across areas of your business will also be essential. This all helps to preserve everyone’s ‘bubble’ to as small a number of people as possible.

Contact Tracing in Your Business out of Lock-down

For a fleeting moment before lock-down, we all started hearing about contact tracing. We’re pretty familiar with it now but we don’t have much experience working with it in place. For about 72 hours before we went into lock-down, hospitality businesses were required to keep records of who came into their establishments. This was quite a rushed process and like all things in those early days, it was a bit of a shambles.

The good news is that in this modern age, you have a lot of options when it comes to tracking people. Most of these options though pose some level of hygiene risk and will need to be properly managed in order to reduce this risk and keep track of the necessary data. Here are our top two recommendations:

  1. Pen & paper. A good old school visitors book and a pen. Just make sure to regularly sanitise the pen between visitors, or encourage them to use their own.
  2. Tablet & software. The modern solution to visitor management. Software like SwipedOn is a great way to interact with and track your visitors.

If you are doing click and collect orders only, keep the records of when people collect so you know the details without having to have extra interactions creating a potential point of contamination.

Forecast Your Options for Getting Your Business out of Lock-down

With the severe amount of unknowns, it is essential to run cashflow forecasts for a range of level 3 scenarios.

We recommend or clients use Float Cashflow Forecasting software. We currently have a number of free subscriptions to this software for the period through till 30th June 2020. If you could use the extra insight for your business, reach out to our team and we’ll have a chat about how we can get you set up with a free subscription.

Not all Businesses will be Able to Operate at Alert Level 3

It is really important to keep in mind that not all businesses will be able to operate out of lock-down in level 3. The government has made it clear that any move to level 3 will not be a return to business as usual. For many businesses, compliance will be far too difficult or cost prohibitive for opening to be worthwhile.

Many non-essential retail stores, services, offices and manufacturing businesses which involve close contact between staff or customers will not be able to operate. While not being able to open while other businesses do may be frustrating, you should still look to do as much as possible remotely.

Shifting to Alert Level 2 and Below

Eventually, we’ll drop to Alert Level 2. Slowly business will start to return to a new kind of normal.

At level 2, if you can, keep as many of your staff as possible working from home. It is likely that some staff may want to keep doing this as a new normal. If you can manage this, it is well worth considering and may reduce office overheads.

Keep in Contact with Your Customers

Before and after you get you business out of lock-down, it will be important to communicate with your customers so they know exactly what to expect at every level.

We have already advised all of our clients by email and via social media what our plans are at every level. We will use the same channels to advise of any updates. It is likely you have both an email database and a variety of social media channels to utilise for keeping in contact with your customers. There’s never been a better time to make use of those databases to ensure open communication and the safety of staff and customers is maintained.

The Regular Flu Season is Still Ahead

It is essential to remember that as we head out of ‘Covid-19 season’ we will be heading straight into our regular flu season. The good news is that maintaining many of your COVID-19 protocols for Health, Safety and Wellness will be beneficial for the regular flu season as well.

Getting flu shots for your staff is a tax deductible expense. Yes, really. We aim to get our team all jabbed every year. If you are able to, reach out to your local pharmacy or medical clinic and see if they can set up an in-workplace vaccination clinic. This is a great way to support another local business while also preventing your team from having to go into a place with a lot of other potential sick people.

Start Planning Now for Getting Your Business Out of Lock-down

There is no better time than now to start planning. Map out a few hypothetical scenarios for each alert level. What do you need for each scenario? How many staff? Do you need to order some new supplies now?

Get high-level cashflow projections sorted for each scenario. It may be that in some scenarios, it is more expensive to open than to stay closed. It is essential to know this in advance and avoid expensive mistakes.

There are no Guarantees

There are no guarantees that a move to Alert Level 3 and getting your business out of lock-down will be a permanent thing. Everything hinges on us collectively maintaining successful community management of COVID-19.

Be prepared for us to go back up to Alert Level 4 if the health situation worsens.

Get Access to our Free Business Continuity Resources.

We have developed a comprehensive guide to developing a business continuity plan for your business. This is an essential plan for navigating this current and all future challenges your business may face.

Click here to access the guide.

From the guide, you can access and download our free business continuity plan template. If you need a run-through of the guide and the plan template or if you want a complimentary 30 minute review once you’ve completed it, book in a chat with us here.

Reach out for Support

We’re here to help. Whether for help with your plans, your cashflow or simply for a friendly chat, reach out to the team at MBP. We’re all in this together.

We have a team of business advisors, accountants and HR specialists to help you plan to succeed.

Hardship Support

While many of our clients are not able to trade at all, we have rolled out our hardship assistance program so they never have to worry about our payment deadlines.

We can delay the due date on your invoices by up to 180 days. This means you can access the help and support you need and leave paying us until we’ve helped you back on your feet.

Fully Funded Services

Thanks to generous private funding and the support of our team, we are able to offer a range of our essential business support services free of charge to effected businesses. We’ll have a new page up and running in the coming days to outline the services and application process. In the meantime, reach out to your dedicated MBP Business Partner or simply email mailbox@mbponline.co.nz to start a conversation about how we can help.