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You’ve got a fabulous idea for a new business but are unsure about which business model you should work with. We take a look at B2B vs B2C to help you decide if selling to customers is right for you, or you’d prefer to sell directly to other businesses instead.

What Are the Differences in Selling B2B vs B2C?

You are in business to sell your products or services and make a profit. You’ve got two choices when doing so: sell to the consumers who are the general public or sell to other businesses who will either resell your products or use them to make their products.

Depending on the products you sell, this decision may already have been taken away from you. For instance, if you sell pulp for papermaking, you are most likely going to sell to another business who can turn that pulp into paper. If you sell baby clothes though, you’re probably going to sell directly to your customers.

Let’s take a look at the main differences between both of these business models.

B2B or Business to Business model:

  • selling your product or service directly to another business
  • often requires large product quantities delivered on a set date
  • requires a long-term relationship between you and your buyers
  • involves more people in the buying decision and process
  • possibly selling your product at a lower price than a consumer would pay for it
  • less of a lead pool to grow to purchase your product or service
  • requires in-depth knowledge about and sharing of your product or service
  • a more complex and involved selling process
  • payments are often received a month or later after product/service delivery

B2C or Business to Consumer model:

  • selling product or service directly to individual customers
  • wide lead pool to target and sell to
  • top price for your product/service paid by the customer
  • small quantities sold at a time
  • fewer people involved in the buying process
  • short relationship with customers
  • customers interested in benefit to themselves
  • instant payment upon purchase
  • easier to sell to individual customers than large corporations

As to which path your business should take, it comes down to whether it would work for what you sell and if you are happy to sell that way. Remember though, that both business models will still require the standard business considerations: a website, good bookkeeping and financial management, a business plan, cashflow management and outsourcing. The good news is, we can help you with all of those! Get in touch with our team today to arrange a chat about your business and how we can help.

For many small businesses, the best way to increase profitability is to increase turnover, as there’s no limit to sales but there is a limit to how much you can reduce your costs.

Let’s look at how you can focus on each of the five ways in our profit increase calculator to achieve your goal of improving profits.

Increase Your Leads

By interacting with greater numbers of people, you’ll increase your chances of turning more consumers into customers – or at the very least, having them lead you to potential customers.

For example, if you own a convenience store and you can come up with some attractive signage out front to get more people into your store, you’ll increase your leads.

So what can you do to increase leads or make more people aware of your business? A few tactics you might consider using to increase your leads include:

  • Advertising – set a budget and increase how much your business is promoted.
  • Direct marketing – work out your target audience and market directly to them via email.
  • Network – attend industry events and conferences to meet potential customers. These may be moved online for the meantime.
  • Create a website – to open online and international opportunities.
  • Develop new distribution channels – think about using agents, licensing your goods, or using new distributors.

Convert More of Your Leads into Customers

How many potential customers walk out of your store, leave your website, or inquire about your services without making a purchase?

Just imagine if you could convert 10% of those people into customers. How many extra sales per day would that be?

A few tactics you might consider using to convert more leads into customers include:

  • Arrange training for employees – on sales conversion and sales closing methods.
  • Personally attending a sales training course.
  • Running demonstrations – for potential customers to see what you have to offer and how they could benefit.
  • Highlighting the benefits of your goods or services – through promotional material, your website, blog advice, social media platforms, and free trial offers.
  • Preparing incentives – for your staff to offer to potential customers, hopefully encouraging them to purchase.

Increase the Number of Items You Sell per Customer

If you can entice your customers to buy just one more item from your business each year, your sales (and hopefully your profits) will increase.

A few tactics you might think about using to increase the number of items you sell to each customer include:

  • Widening your product range – by asking customers what else they would be interested in buying from you.
  • Bundling products and services together – like adding after-sales help to certain products.
  • Increasing capacity and capability – for example, purchasing extra equipment to increase your capacity while hiring additional staff to enhance your capability.
  • Researching your competitors’ offerings – to find product or service opportunities.

Increase Your Average Sale Value

Can you come up with some ways of increasing the average value of each sale you make? Rather than hiking up prices, see if you can increase prices by small margins (like 1-3%) or find ways to sell higher-priced items more often.

A few tactics you might think about using to increase your average sale include:

  • Training your staff – so they’re confident offering complementary items and upselling more expensive goods.
  • Increasing prices across the board – would your customers notice a small price increase? Consider informing them and trying it, as the extra money will go towards your bottom line.
  • Advertising your higher-valued products or services more often.
  • Developing a premium product or service – and encouraging your regulars to go for it.

Increase Net Profit Percentage

A few tactics you might try to increase your net profit percentage include:

  • Identifying and monitoring your top five expenses in your budget reports.
  • Finding out where you can make savings and reduce costs.
  • Concentrating on higher-margin services or products.
  • Looking into alternative suppliers with cheaper supplies.

Review these five ways of increasing your profits at least every year. In the meantime, plug some figures into our profit increase calculator to test what you could change and the effects of those changes on your profit.

By using simple, practical steps, you can improve your business’s profitability. Chat to us to find out more. Click here to book a free chat with an MBP Business Partner.

Have you given any thought to which business structure is right for your business? We’ll be honest and admits it’s not usually the first thing that comes to people’s minds when starting or buying a business. However, the way that you structure your business plays a significant role in how it functions down the track.

In NZ, there are three common business structures, along with some which are not so common. We’re sticking with the most common of these structures today, though if you think another type would be better for your business, get in touch and we’ll help you sort it out.

The three most common NZ business structures are:

  • Sole trader
  • Partnership
  • Limited liability company

To help you decide which one you should choose, we’ll work through them individually.

Understanding the Sole Trader Business Structure

A sole trader structure involves only one person: you. It is the simplest structure in which you are the only individual who is liable for every part of your business. This doesn’t mean that you have to do it all alone as you can hire employees to help you run it. You’ll just need to register yourself as an employer with the IRD and meet the required obligations.

As a sole trader, you use your IRD number for tax purposes, filling in a personal tax return. You can claim expenses to lower the amount of tax you pay and generally, any business losses can be offset against any other personal income. Trading under your own name is fine, as the operational life of this business structure simply depends on you.

The advantages of choosing to become a sole trader include:

  • it is quick to set up with no red tape
  • there are no legal fees to pay during the establishment phase
  • you receive all the profits
  • you’ll have total control of the entire business
  • no business name registration is required
  • you can change your business structure easily in the future

Downsides to being a sole trader are:

  • you are completely responsible for all debts and claims
  • your assets can be at put at risk
  • harder to get finance should you need it
  • more difficult to sell as a working business
  • can be harder to grow a business using this structure
  • there are no shares to sell to raise capital
  • you are responsible for your KiwiSaver contributions

For further advice and information about this business type, get in touch.

Understanding the Partnership Business Structure

The partnership structure is often used by two or more professional individuals who already have experience in running a business. There are no rules regarding how much each partner can own, meaning an uneven split of 95% to 5% is acceptable. What does happen though, is the profits you receive and amount of work you are required to do often depends on the ownership percentage.

Instead of the partnership paying tax, each of the partners themselves is responsible for paying tax based upon the profit share they receive. To avoid problems, it is seriously recommended that there is a legally drawn partnership agreement which sets out all the details on how the partnership will be run.

The pros of choosing a partnership business structure include:

  • everyone shares costs and responsibility
  • relatively simple and low cost to run
  • each partner can focus on their specialities
  • you can offset losses against your other income
  • partners can bring in capital investment to the business
  • the running tasks of operating a business are shared

The cons of choosing a partnership can include:

  • each partner has an equal share in the business’ liabilities and debts
  • you need to make decisions with your partners
  • disagreements amongst partners are common
  • you can’t sell shares
  • you are responsible for your KiwiSaver contributions

To discuss if this structure is right for your business, get in touch with us.

Understanding the Limited Liability Company Structure

Commonly referred to as a company, a business with this structure is separate from the business owners. In other words, a company is a separate legal entity.  Any money earned will belong to the company and will pay its tax at the corporate tax rate. The shareholders then receive the profit from the company, who then individually pay income tax on this.

The shareholders, AKA the business owners, have less exposure to any financial or legal issues relating to the business.  So, while the company has full responsibility for all its own financial and legal obligations, the liability of the shareholders is less. This means a shareholder is only responsible for any personal guarantees they have given and losses to the dollar amount of their shares.

The advantages of choosing a company business structure include:

  • less personal responsibility for business debts and liabilities
  • easy to sell or pass on ownership
  • shareholder profit distributes are flexible
  • lower tax rate than top personal rats
  • easier to get funding approved
  • seen as a highly credible business structure by the market
  • easy to keep growing

The downsides include:

  • more red tape and paperwork to do
  • need to register business through the Companies Office
  • more time consuming to get up and running
  • higher establishment and compliance costs
  • often require more investment to grow
  • you are responsible for your KiwiSaver contributions

It is important to note, that the limited liability company is only one of three company structures. It is the most common one though. Others include co-operative companies and unlimited companies. To discuss which company structure is best for you, get in touch with us today.

Where to Next When Choosing a Business Structure?

While there is a simple tool available on the MBIE website to help select a business structure, there is no substitute for personal advice. As accountants and business advisors, we deal with these structures daily, putting us in the best position to help you make an informed decision. To make a time to discuss your business with one of our business advisors, book your free 30 minutes chat with us via our website now.

For many years, the low value asset threshold for depreciation had been set at $500.00. This meant that everything over $500.00 had to be capitalised and depreciated as a fixed asset. The cost of many business items has increased significantly since the rules were last reviewed. At the same time, the useful life of the items has decreased. This is why the government was reviewing the rules and planning to increase the threshold.

The pandemic came along and the under review low value asset rules were a perfect option to allow some quick action to help stimulate business investment. The updated rules were one of the first COVID-19 Business Response measures, announced in March 2020.

The New Low Value Asset Rules

From the 17th March 2020, the low value asset threshold for depreciation has been increased to $5,000.00.

This is a ten-fold increase from the previous threshold of $500.00. The governments intention for this is to spur business investment. It is hoped that businesses will be encouraged to spend more in order to take advantage of the ability to expense items costing up to $5,000.00. This was a direct reaction to the drop in business confidence as a result of COVID-19.

12 Month Time-frame for New Rules

This new threshold is strictly limited and expires on the 16th March 2021. In order to expense a low value asset costing up to $5,000.00, you must purchase it on or after the 17th March 2020 but before the end of business on the 16th March 2021.

There was initially some confusion around when the rules would come into effect. This was largely due to the chaotic situation in the early days of the pandemic and the requirement for the rules to be amended by legislation. The 12-month period is as outlined above and is not in line with the standard 2020-2021 tax year.

Low Value Asset Rules from March 2021

From the 17th March 2021, the low value asset threshold for depreciation will be $1,000.00.

This is double the old limit of $500.00 and is in line with the original uplift intentions signaled before COVID-19.

There is no time limit on this adjustment. It will remain effective until varied by future legislation.

Benefits of the Adjusted Low Value Asset Rules

Benefits for Small Business Owners

If you have been put off investing in your business because you would have to wait years to claim the full tax benefits, this may be the opportunity you have been waiting for. Need a few new computers? Now’s the time to invest. Need to refresh the workspace to make it a bit more inviting and productive? Now’s the time to invest. Need to optimise your online presence for post-covid growth? Now’s the time to invest.

If you run a small business selling to other businesses, this is a perfect opportunity to market the tax deduct-ability of your products. For many savvy business owners, it might be just the sweetner they need to convince them to spend up to $5,000.00 with you.

Benefits for Residential Property Investors and Landlords

The Healthy Homes Standards are a potentially costly burden for may landlords and property investors to bear. These changes offer the ability to implement the required expenses and claim the full tax deduction in this tax year.

This means that you can invest in the new heatpump, glazing or insulation and claim the full amount as an expense (as long as it remains under $5,000.00).

The requirement for you to include a statement of compliance with the Healthy Homes Standards has also been extended by the government. You were required to comply with this new regulation from the 1st of July 2020. This has now been delayed until the 1st of December 2020.

There will not be a better time to get the required upgrades done.

Depreciation Adjustments Announced with Same Legislation

The government also announced changes to the commercial investment property depreciation rules in the same package of tax changes. This will allow depreciation in much the same was as prior to the 0% rules which were passed in October of 2010. If you would like to view the IRD information on this announcement, click here. This depreciation rule may apply to your AirBNB properties.

 

If you would like a run-through of the new rules and how they may benefit your business, feel free to get in touch with us. You can book in a free chat with one of our team or simply flick us an email.

New Zealand’s Budget 2020 was promised to be the “jobs budget” by the Prime Minister just prior to its announcement.  Unfortunately, it is difficult to see how this budget saves or creates many jobs in the short to medium term.  Of course, it must be noted that there is $20Billion+ in COVID-19 recovery spending yet to be announced and some of this additional funding could be well-targeted.

There are a few announcements that will certainly save or create jobs in the long-term.  These include:

An existing $12Billion infrastructure fund has been increased by an additional $3Billion. This $15Billion will be used to fund soon-to-be-announced infrastructure projects.  Some 1,500 projects, totaling $136Billion, have applied for a share of this funding. This suggests we may see less than 200 projects actually break ground nation wide.

This additional $3Billion will help to plug the gap that will inevitably be left by private and council infrastructure schemes that are deferred or cancelled. So this will likely save jobs as opposed to create many new ones.  However, while changes are being made to the Resource Management Act to fast-track these projects, it is still safe to assume that it will take some time for these projects to commence. This will add to short-term pressures in the infrastructure sector with skilled workers in high demand globally.

8,000 additional public/transitional homes will be built. This will undoubtedly help save the jobs of builders as some private sector projects will likely be delayed. We have already seen some developments delayed till next year at the earliest based on the prospect of falling house prices making them less economical in the short term. Like with the infrastructure boost, this will not happen overnight. The government has already demonstrated how difficult it is to build even 1,000 homes over the past two years. This suggests we may be waiting at least 8 to 16 years to see the outcome of this announcement.

11,000 “green jobs” will be created in the regions.  These will be for the likes of pest and predator control and in upgrading DOC tracks and huts.  These initiatives will add real value to the nation, but again these jobs will not be created overnight. Many of these jobs will also not be long-term. With predator free targets in place and limited land for planting trees, once the work is done what will these jobs evolve into?

$1.6b towards training – a significant investment will be made in training.  Long-term this will definitely benefit New Zealand, but it will do little to solve the immediate problems created by the pandemic.  It is also questionable whether jobs will exist for these newly up-skilled people in a potential recessionary environment. The infrastructure spending and target of 8,000 homes will give some work. However, policy and legislative pressures on other sectors to benefit from the training boost, like farming and the primary sector, will likely see less demand for jobs in this sector over time. This investment needs to be targeted to the future of work or the government needs to change its legislative agenda towards the primary sector if it wants these trainees to have somewhere to work.

Policy consultants and bureaucrats. While very little funding has been allocated towards assisting the private sector, the Government sector has been sprayed with “helicopter money”.  This will certainly support the Wellington job market and economy.

What is in Budget 2020 for Small and Medium Businesses?

Disappointingly, there is very little in this budget in the way of near-term support for businesses. However, Government spending is stimulatory and there is certainly no shortage of new Government spending in Budget 2020! There is no doubt that this additional spending will help support the economy in the long term. However, it will take some time for the stimulatory effect of that spending to filter down into the wider economy and many small businesses are crying out for help now.

In terms of short-term relief, there really isn’t much for businesses (yet).  However, here are some of the measures that were announced:

  • An 8-week extension to the Wage Subsidy for businesses that have suffered a 50% decline in revenue for 30 days prior to applying for the extension when compared to the same 30 days last year.  See below for more detail on this.  This will be a welcome relief to the accommodation, hospitality and tourism sectors who are really hurting.
  • A $400m tourism recovery fund.  This seems to be aimed mainly at accessing advice around adapting tourism businesses towards domestic and Trans-Tasman markets. There also appears to be a focus on marketing New Zealand to Kiwi’s. Unfortunately there was limited detail in the budget announcements and it seems this fund is destined to be ‘working grouped’ over the coming weeks.
  • $150m in loans to R&D providers.
  • Additional funding for WINZ to place 10,000 primary sector jobs.
  • Financial support for businesses to retain apprentices.

Overall, the $50Billion COVID-19 recovery fund includes just $4Billion in business support. With $3.2Billion of this being consumed by the extension to the wage subsidy there is certainly not a lot to be optimistic about in the short to medium term. These announcements have simply bought the government a few more weeks to come up with some targeted, practical support for the sectors most damaged by the economic shutdown.

Extension to the Wage Subsidy Scheme

From the 10th June 2020, businesses who continue to be severely affected by COVID-19 will be able to apply for another 8 weeks of Wage Subsidy. Applications will be open for the extension for 12 weeks from the 10th June 2020.

The qualifying criteria around turnover has been substantially tightened from the first phase of the scheme. To qualify, a business must have suffered a 50% turnover reduction for the 30 days before the application is made compared to the same period last year (or a comparable period for a business that is less than 12 months old or experiencing high growth before COVID-19).

The same full-time rate of $585.80 and part-time rate of $350 will apply. At this stage, we understand that all other criteria will remain broadly the same.

Hospitality and Tourism Sectors

It goes without saying that two of the worst affected sectors are tourism and hospitality.  The shift to Level 2 is only a partial relief in these sectors so the extension to the wage subsidy will be much welcomed news for these businesses struggling for survival. While the wage subsidy scheme is not without its flaws or critics, there is no doubt that so far it has saved jobs and businesses, especially in the hospitality and tourism sectors. However, many employers in these sectors are going to need more than just the wage subsidy to survive long enough to be around for the recovery.  Presumably, there will be some more targeted relief in the coming weeks, but what these sectors need the most is some certainty about when restrictions will be loosened so that they can properly plan ahead and take necessary steps to mitigate the losses until they can begin trading again.

Tax Changes in Budget 2020

No tax changes were announced in budget 2020. However, New Zealand’s debt is forecast to balloon from $118Billion to over $317Billion in the next 4 years. Core crown debts alone will be well over $200Billion, 54% of GDP. This massive increase in Government debt and makes future tax increases a very strong possibility, if not ineviatble.

Where will the Additional $20Billion+ in Spending Go from Budget 2020?

As we mentioned earlier, there is still approximately $20Billion+ in funding to be allocated. The Finance Minister suggested that there will be further announcements in the residential housing space but hasn’t really signaled where the rest will go.

Perhaps the Government wants to stand back and get a feel for how much of a positive impact shifting to Level 2 has before deciding how to spend this money.

Considerable Room for Improvement

While the government has moved quickly with things like the wage subsidy to help save jobs in the immediate term, the recent announcements in budget 2020 have very little impact where it is most needed. We will continue to monitor announcements closely to see if some targeted, long-term relief is announced to support the hundreds of thousands of small and medium businesses across New Zealand. These businesses are a lifeline for countless families and the backbone of local communities across the country. While large organisations benefit from hundreds of millions in loans and large infrastructure projects, the government has so far overlooked the little guys in their long-term plans.

We’re Here to Help

At MBP, we’re here to help. The government’s additional COVID-19 funding for the regional business partner network has already dried up after helping less than 1% of the businesses desperately in need. That’s why we partnered with local business leaders to fully fund a range of our services that are essential for business survival and success in the face of the challenges we are presented with.

If you and your business need a hand, reach out and book in a chat with our team. We’re happy to help however we can.